Summer Ramen: Hiyashi Chuka Soba

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Lucky lovely noodles, ramen the way I imagined they should be, (made by me, or you, with this recipe), and it’s summer, lovely and cool. Still. So I’ll share a meal with you, a dish to enjoy in warm weather: hyashi chuka soba. It’s exotic but so familiar in a sweet-sour-round broth, cool noodles topped with your favorite foods. Enjoy.

Summertime Chilled Ramen
Hiyashi Chukasoba
serves 4
page 346

Sauce:

  • 1/4 cup mirin (sweet cooking wine)
  • 1 Tablespoon sugar
  • 1 1/3 cup ramen stock or chicken stock
  • 1/3 cup shoyu (soy sauce)
  • 2 1/2 Tablespoons komezu (rice vinegar)
  • 1 Tablespoon sesame oil
  • 2 teaspoons ginger juice

In a saucepan, bring the mirin to a gentle simmer to evaporate the alcohol. Add sugar and ramen stock, and bring to a boil. Add the soy sauce and bring just to a boil. Transfer to a clean jar. Add the rice vinegar, sesame oil, and ginger juice. Refrigerate for 2 to 3 hours.

Egg Strips:

  • pinch of salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 4 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 1/2 Tablespoons vegetable oil (I used much less)

Stir the salt and sugar into the eggs. Note stirring with a chopstick works well because you don’t want to make the eggs frothy.
If you have a tamagoyaki-ki, a rectangular Japanese skillet, now is your chance to make use of it! Otherwise, use an 8-inch non-stick skillet or a well seasoned cast iron pan. Heat your skillet over medium heat. When it’s hot, dip a wadded paper towel into a small dish of vegetable oil. Smear the bottom and sides of your skillet with the oil. Remove skillet from heat and spoon enough of the egg mixture to thinly coat the bottom of your pan. You may need to tilt the pan to cover the whole bottom. Return the skillet to the heat and cook the egg until it’s firm on the bottom. Lift the omelette and flip to cook the other side, about 3 seconds. Remove to a paper towel lined plate. Make 8 thin omelettes. Cut the omelettes into 2-inch long julienne strips.

The Vegetables:

  • 3 cups soybean or mung bean sprouts
  • 2 ounces mung bean noodles
  • 1 small Japanese cucumber, julienned in 2 1/2-inch lengths
  • 8 cherry tomatoes, cut in half
  • 10 slices chashu, or cooked ham or chicken breast, julienned in 2-inch lengths

If you can get soybean sprouts, try them: they are delicious. Clean the sprouts by cutting off the brown root tips. In a pot of boiling water (add a little vegetable oil), blanch the sprouts for 30 seconds. Immediately drain and rinse in cold water. Drain again.
Soak the mung bean noodles in boiled water for 5 minutes. Drain and cool under running water. Cut into 6-inch lengths. (or follow package directions)

The Noodles:

  • 13 ounces dried chuasoba noodles
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil

In a large pot of boiling water, cook the noodles al dente, 3 to 5 minutes, or as instructed on the package. Drain and wash under cold running water. Drain and toss with the sesame oil.
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Other possible toppings:
shrimp, crabmeat, squid, kanikama
cooked ham or chicken breast, julienned in 2-inch lengths
lettuce, carrot, fennel bulb, bell peppers, cucumber, asparagus, broccoli, wakame, zucchini, green beans, snowpeas, avocado, tomatoes

If you can get soybean sprouts, try them: they are delicious. Clean the sprouts by cutting off the brown root tips. In a pot of boiling water (add a little vegetable oil), blanch the sprouts for 30 seconds. Immediately drain and rinse in cold water. Drain again.
Soak the mung bean noodles in boiled water for 5 minutes. Drain and cool under running water. Cut into 6-inch lengths. (or follow package directions)

If you use other vegetables, blanch as appropriate: snowpeas, asparagus, broccoli, green beans. Parboil carrots and other “hard” vegetables. Soak wakame. Salt cucumbers and drain.

https://1tess.wordpress.com/2008/08/10/hiyashi-chuka-soba-japanese-summertime-noodles/
https://1tess.wordpress.com/2009/07/05/hiyashi-chuka-soba/

Here I am early on a fine June day all ahead to enjoy where I remember wanting to be late on a winter heavy night. One Five Seven so r.early it has not become yet
time to do anything…

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11 thoughts on “Summer Ramen: Hiyashi Chuka Soba

    • I usually double the recipe and keep the sauce/broth in the fridge to have on hand for when it’s too hot to cook. ≥^!^≤

  1. Hey Tess,
    Hiyashi Chuka Soba! What a lovely summer delight! I friend of mine used to chill the bowls on ice before she put the salad together. Another thing that she did, as far as toppings go, was to add long slices of white cheese, some simple Japanese variety, to compliment the ham and cucumber “wands”. I remember bean sprouts, but because they were long and skinny… were they soy or mung bean sprouts? Tomato wedges too. But it was the amazing sesame oil dressing that took it over the top. I noticed that you have used avocados! Here in LA, we have lots… and it seems like such a lovely pairing with the dressing! Yummy! A delightful summer repast looms on the horizon! Thank you Tess!

    • Oh, yes: I have one of those pans too. I don’t think I’ve ever posted about it!!! hmm…
      This recipe is lighter than the one with sesame sauce. This one is more like a well-flavored broth. I do like the sesame sauce too. Here’s the recipe I use:
      Spicy Sesame Sauce

      Cheese sounds good! I never thought of chilling the bowls either.

      The soy sprouts have more flavor than the mung bean sprouts, but you definitely have to blanch them to get rid of the “raw” taste.

      Avocados are one of the many exotic fruits and vegetables we never had when I was growing up! When I first tasted them I was amazed.

      • Hi Again Tess,
        Goma tare… Sort of like for Shabu Shabu? Looks Scrumptious!! I myself, like a little “kick”. Especially in the warmer months. I’m no pro yet at homemade tamago yaki, but I really LOVE the flavor! I’ll keep trying. I have an interesting bit of trivia for you. In Downtown Los Angeles in the early 1970’s, there was a restaurant in the Little Tokyo area named ‘Tokyo Kaikan’. It was a magical place! They had a tempura bar, a shabu shabu bar, a tepan-yaki bar, and of course a sushi bar. (Don’t forget the piano bar down on the very end)! Chef Mashita has been credited with inventing the California Roll!! Besides the California roll with crab, avocado just snuggles in so nicely with a good toro tuna as well. Don’t forget the daikon sprouts and a sprightly ponzu! I’m off and running… hee hee.

        • Hi again Karla,
          That’s interesting. I love California rolls with toasted sesame seeds or tobiko: so pretty. And what about the cucumber and cream cheese rolls; not authentically but tasty none-the-less.

          I should do a post with the various sesame sauces I’ve made…

  2. Hey Tess,
    There are now so many amazing rolls out there! My favorite one has deep fried soft-shell crab in it! I would LOVE a post on sesame sauces!

  3. Jennifer I clicked on your link at the Support forum. This food here is very very home town for me because I was born and raised in Hawaii, where we ate ramin all the time or went out to a little cafe to have it. In Hawaii it is called SAIMIN, and it covers all of the types of noodles there are. I loved it. Little did I know when I clicked this that I would find it here. Nice site!!

    I love that you include avocadoes.

    ~Lorna

    • Hi Lorna~
      not Jennifer, but Tess here! no problem: just don’t call me “late for dinner” LOL
      I’m glad you like my site; it’s a fun hobby.

      (Not sure why, but I just found your comment—didn’t get an email notice)

  4. Pingback: Oysters So-Men Love « Tess's Japanese Kitchen

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