Tsukimi: Moon Viewing

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My favorite moon-viewing noodle bowls were lovely glowing golden glass, beautiful as the full autumnal equinox moon.
Tsukimi (月見) refers to the Japanese tradition of holding parties to view the harvest moon. Moon viewing was introduced to Japan from China during the Nara (710-794) and Heian periods (794-1185).
Tsukimi udon (or soba) are hot noodles served with a raw egg on top to represent the moon.

Udon with Niboshi Kakejiru

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I am on my own for the weekend and noodles are perfect when dinner is for one. I’ve never tried the niboshi dashi before, so using it to make kakejiru (broth for hot noodles) was a fine start. I made udon with tofu, green onions, and just because they looked so pretty in the store, some cherry tomatoes.

Niboshi Dashi: dried sardine broth

☛ → night and day
Ô

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Niboshi are baby sardines (anchovies in some translations) that have been boiled once then dried. Compared to katsuobushi, stock made with niboshi has a fishier flavor. They vary in size from about 1.5″ to over 3″long with the smaller ones having a milder flavor. This stock is used in both Korean and Japanese cooking for miso soup, hot pots (nabemono), and strongly flavored noodle dishes. Some bloggers note that niboshi dashi is more commonly in the Tokyo area than in Osaka/Kyoto; and katsuo dashi is used more in the summer, niboshi in the winter.

Dashi: One, Two… / Ichi, Ni…

Ð → → → → ♥ ♥    ☛ happy valentine’s day! ★ ☆ ★ ☆

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Dashi is essential for Japanese cooking. It is usually a clear, non-oily fish stock used for soups, simmered dishes, salad dressings, and marinades. Dashi provides the subtle umami that is the foundation of Japanese cuisine. Dashi can be made with kelp (kombu), dried bonito (katsuobushi), dried baby sardines (niboshi), dried shiitake mushrooms, or a combination of two or three of these ingredients.

Vegetarian Dashi

Ð → → → → ♥ ♥    ☛ happy valentine’s day! ★ ☆ ★ ☆

https://1tess.wordpress.com
In Japanese cooking the stock that is the basis for soups, braises, sauces, and dressings is dashi. It can be made with kombu (dried kelp, sometimes spelled as konbu), hoshi-shiitake (dried mushrooms), katsuobushi (dried bonito flakes), or niboshi (dried anchovies, sometimes called sardines). I have seen references to making dashi with clams (asari or shijimi), dried mackerel flakes (sababushi), or dried young “flying fishes.”